Protestant/Other Christians

Kenneth Copeland is a Pentecostal preacher who has championed the “name it, claim it” tradition in Protestantism. He has an “empire” which he has built that spreads across the world with tens of thousands of followers, or more.

I remember as a teenager listening to him on TV and radio with my parents. Many of our friends at the time were followers of his teachings. 

Click on this image to watch the video

There would have been no more unlikely candidate to correspond lovingly back-and-forth on video with Pope Francis than Copeland. He admits this himself in the video. And he even brought up a Anglican priest named Tony Palmer to address his auditorium full of Charismatic leaders at their leader’s conference. The topic was unity and the end of the protest of Protestantism. Quite amazing actually.

This video shows the Kenneth Copeland leadership conference giving a prime-time slot to Anglican Bishop. Tony Palmer to share that the whole basis of the Protestant Reformation is now resolved and there no more reason for protestation.

The Pope spontaneously addressing Copeland's conference

He then shows a personal video that Bp. Tony made of Pope Francis addressing the conference participants, decrying the sins that have created our separation and asking for their prayers. Then Kenneth Copeland and leaders respond praying in the Spirit for Pope Francis and sending him back a video telling him that they love him!

This video is 45 minutes long and worth watching. It is divided up this way:

It starts with Kenneth Copeland praying and introducing Anglican Bishop Tony Palmer who gives his story of his conversion to liturgical worship and his friendship with Pope Francis before he was pope.

Then we see a video the Pope sent to Kenneth Copeland and his leadership conference and Kenneth Copeland the conference responding back to the Pope. Quite remarkable and demonstrates a move toward unity in much of Christianity.

You can watch the video by clicking on either of the images above.

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Can Evangelicals and Catholics be Friends?

by Steve Ray on March 2, 2014

Catholics Can Learn a Good Deal From Them But Big Differences Remain

By Father Dwight Longenecker

ROME, February 28, 2014 (Zenit.org) – Last week Evangelical Anglican Bishop Tony Palmer spoke to a gathering of Pentecostal Christian leaders in America and showed them a personal video greeting from Pope Francis.

Bishop Palmer became friends with Pope Francis when he was in Argentina as a missionary ten years ago. Now his friend is the Pope and together they are reaching out in friendship to Evangelical Christians. But can Evangelical Protestants (who are traditionally very anti-Catholic) be friends with the Pope?

I was brought up in a strict Evangelical home in the United States. We went to church twice on a Sunday, listened to forty-five minute sermons and had to memorise Bible verses. After high school I went to the fundamentalist college which gave the fiery Northern Irish preacher Ian Paisely his honorary doctorate.

By God’s grace I left that extreme religion and moved to England to become an Anglican priest. After serving for ten years as an Anglican minister I and my family became Catholics. I thank God for my solid Evangelical faith and for fifteen years in the Anglican Church. I explain to my friends that I haven’t forsaken those other forms of Christianity. Becoming a Catholic meant accepting more of the Christian faith. All the good things in the other traditions are fulfilled in the Catholic faith.

The evangelical faith is incomplete without the Catholic Church, but we are also incomplete without those Christians who are separated from us. The evangelicals have some good traditions we can learn from.

Evangelicals tend to be excellent communicators and preachers. We could do with those skills in the Catholic Church. The Evangelicals love the Bible and study it with passion. Our people could do with a better grasp of Scripture. Evangelical churches are strong on fellowship. They really make people feel they belong to a loving community. Some of our parishes could improve in this area. The evangelicals have a strong tradition of sharing the gospel in creative and attractive ways. Sometimes Catholics forget that we are all called to share the good news of Jesus Christ with others.

Pope Francis calls us afresh to take part in the New Evangelization and we can learn some lessons from the Evangelicals on how to do this. However, the learning process is not all one way. The new generation of Evangelicals like Tony Palmer are more tolerant and open-minded towards Catholicism.

They are less frightened of other forms of worship and are happy to experiment and be open to beliefs and worship practices which would have horrified their parents and grandparents. These “convergent church” Christians are being freed from their old prejudice to explore Benedictine retreats, Ignatian spirituality and Catholic social teaching. Evangelical magazines publish explorations of Catholic styles of worship. I’ve heard of Baptist churches where they have started using candles, celebrate communion every week instead of four times a year and observe the liturgical year. A Methodist minister I know wears vestments for his celebration of Holy Communion, goes to monasteries on retreat and uses the Divine Office for his daily devotions.

These promising signs, and many more, have been brought about because Evangelicals and Catholics are finally realising that there is more that unites them than divides. At the heart of the matter both Evangelicals and Catholics believe in a revealed religion, not a relative religion.

In other words, we both believe that God has spoken and that settles it. The core of the faith has been given by God. It was not made up by people. It was not simply the result of social conditions and the quirks of human history. This fundamental attitude about the faith means we have a gospel to proclaim and a faith to live, and this is in contrast to the wishy washy grey Christians who water down the faith to a beautiful hobby or a system of good manners.

There is plenty of scope for Evangelicals and Catholics to work and worship together. But we have to remember there are also big differences between us. Evangelicals do tend to minimise the faith. They want to cut out lots of things we Catholics believe are essential. There is still a large amount of distrust and misunderstanding between Evangelicals and Catholics.

One of the biggest obstacles to unity is the fact that most Evangelicals don’t see the need for it. They believe individual churches and denominations are all man made, and that you just choose the one that suits you best. Formal union may still be a long way from us, but in the meantime the warmth of affection Pope Francis extended to the Protestants in Texas should be an example to all Catholics.

Popular writer Fr Dwight Longenecker is a former Evangelical, then an Anglican priest. Read his latest book, The Romance of Religion. Visit his blog, browse his books, listen to his radio show and be in touch at dwightlongenecker.com.

He also provides a free weekly newsletter on the practical practice of the Catholic faith. Called FaithWorks!, it has articles on prayer, resources for the spiritual life and advice on how to walk more closely with Christ. Go here to subscribe

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The Protestant and his Three Huts

by Steve Ray on February 26, 2014

I posted this a long time ago, but thought it would be fun to represent it.

A Protestant was stranded all alone on an island. He begins sending smoke signals, hoping that somebody will find him.

Ten years pass, and a boat is sailing by. The captain notices the smoke signals, and decides to pull into the island. When he docks, he sees three huts.

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The Protestant runs out and embraces the captain, and says, “Thank you for rescuing me!” The captain says, “No problem, where are the others?” The man says, “There is only me, I am all alone on this island.”

The captain, confused, asks, “If you are all alone, then why are there three huts?”

The man says, “Well, the first hut is where I live, that’s my home. The second hut is my church, where I worship.” The captain asks, “And what is the third hut?” The man says, “Oh, that was the church I used to go to.”

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Eternal Security: Is Baptist Pastor Charles Stanley Right?

February 11, 2014

ETERNAL SECURITY (Once Saved-Always Saved): Analyzing a Sermon by Baptist Pastor, Charles Stanley By Steve Ray Hello Protestant Friend: Even though I have watched his show off and on over the months, I had no intention of watching Charles Stanley on television last night. It was just that I was tired after getting home and [...]

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Cartoon on Protestantism and the Bible

February 7, 2014

When I look back on my experience I find this cartoon has a ring of truth. There were many verses of the Bible that I either didn’t realize existed (though that may seem strange) or that we just ignored. Other verses I just read with my “Baptist glasses” on and twisted them to fit my [...]

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Response to an Ex-Catholic, now Baptist

January 26, 2014

I received an e-mail from a Southern Baptist and decided to take a few minutes to respond. Thought others might be edified by it so I have posted it here without using his name. His e-mail is contained in regular text and my response is in CAPITAL LETTERS. **************************************************** HELLO FRIEND: I WILL ANSWER BRIEFLY [...]

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St. Ignatius Steps on Luther; Mary Throws Luther out of Heaven

December 26, 2013

Two great Jesuit churches stand near each other in Rome. One is the Church of St. Ignatius and the other the Church of Gesu (Jesus). Both are imposing and majestic and reflect the glory of the Jesuits in their heyday.  The one to the left is called the Church of St. Ignatius Loyola. In Italian [...]

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Who Speaks for God on Morals? Many Choose their Church Like they Choose a Restaurant

December 11, 2013

We have a “church” near our house that is making it comfortable for anyone to join no matter who they are, what they believe or what they practice. They say it is our job to accept and love, to be nice, not to judge. Celebrate Diversity is a slogan of acceptance, multiculturalism, non-judgmental inclusion. Some [...]

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Nathaniel has Converted 5 Catholics out of the Church

August 8, 2013

Nathaniel wrote:  Thanks for the 6-tips which i see is taken from your baptist upbringing. I will use it to win Catholics to Christ and out from the RC Church. It will add to the list of 5 Catholics I’ve already sucessfully evangelized them out of the RC Church. Keep the tips coming :) I [...]

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Cartoon: “This is where our movement came in and finally got the Bible right!”

July 18, 2013
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Why Protestants Reject 7 Books of the Bible – the Short Answer

May 31, 2013

Gary Michuta is an expert on the canon of Scripture, especially in regards to the Deutero-canonical books, what the Protestants call the Apocrypha. You can read his book Why Catholic Bibles Are Bigger to see what I mean. Recently a friend asked Gary for the short answer as to why the Protestants removed seven books from [...]

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How Many Christians to Change a Lightbulb?

May 10, 2013

As we all smile at ourselves: CHARISMATICS: Only 1 – Hands are already in the air. PENTECOSTALS: 10 – One to change the bulb, and nine to pray against the spirit of darkness. PRESBYTERIANS: None – Lights will go on and off at predestined times. ROMAN CATHOLICS: None, they only use candles. BAPTISTS: At least [...]

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What is “Organized Religion”?

March 22, 2013

Hey Steve: while I was on a business trip I had a good conversation with my friends, one who is agnostic and the other an Evangelical.  Both of them agreed they didn’t believe in “organized religion”.  From your Protestant background is there a specific meaning to that term or is it just another way to [...]

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Differences Between Catholic and Protestant Approaches to the Bible

March 10, 2013

“Bible Christians” (a misnomer, since Catholics are the real and original Bible Christians), based on their recently devised “Reformation” principle of sola Scriptura, study the Bible with the following premises: 1. There is no binding authority but the Bible alone; 2. There is no official binding interpretation or interpreter; each person ultimately is their own [...]

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“Sunday Mornings in Ancient Times” or “Why I Teared up Last Sunday”

February 3, 2013

Tears welled up in my eyes — again — at Mass last Sunday. It was not always so. As a former Baptist I used to think the Catholic Mass was a sacrilege and an abomination. How could anyone worship a piece of bread? Really! However, last Sunday I was overcome with emotion while sitting in [...]

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Trail of Blood: Do Baptists Have a Claim to the Original Church?

January 18, 2013

What is the history of Baptists? Can they trace their roots back to the 1st century? Many ”fundamentalist” Baptists believe they can. Are they correct? There is a booklet that is very popular among this fundamentalist crowd. It is entitled “The Trail of Blood”. The booklet claims that Catholics persecuted the true Christians — the Baptists — leaving [...]

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