Artifacts & Biblical History

I love St. Paul and love to write about him and his epistles. I also enjoyed traveling through six countries filming his life story and theology.

St. Paul Dictating his Epistle to the Romans to Tertius

St. Paul’s Letter to the Romans is often seen as impossible to understand except by theologians — and most skip right over this masterpiece.

With hopes that you will take the time to give Romans a second look, I have written a brief summary of the circumstances and a synopsis of his brilliant letter.

It is fun and easy to read and it is given to all with the hope you enjoy it — and St. Paul.

Sweat was beading up on his bald head and thick eyebrows. His pointed beard wagged as he paced the stone floor speaking rapidly. His dark eyes flashed, his hands gesticulated in rhythm with his rapid utterance. His quick mind was obviously way ahead of the words that rushed from his mouth.

Tertius struggled to keep up, his quill scratching rapidly across the parchment. After hours of dictation and careful refinement this letter was rolled up and given into the hands of Phoebe who boarded a wooden merchant vessel heading for the hub of the Empire. The words were Greek, written from the Greek city of Corinth, dictated by a Jew of the Hebrew religion and sent to Latin Rome.

For the rest of the story, click here.

To see our DVD “Paul, Contending for the Faith

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Her face shone as she related the stories—the words were vibrant, and though older now, her memory was excellent.

He sat enraptured as she brought the past into living color. He had traveled a long way to see her and he sat motionless, with furled brow, taking careful notes on his parchment. He spent hours asking questions and listening.

Mary’s stories seemed incredible; but Luke had been a Christian long enough to know the stories were true. He was compiling an orderly account for his Excellency Theophilus.

Luke’s Gospel stands third among the gospels and is the only one written by a non-Jew; in fact, Luke is the only Gentile author in the Bible.

He wrote a sequel to his gospel, the Acts of the Apostles which is the first history of the fledgling Church, also addressed to Theophilus who was probably a governmental dignitary.

Luke and Acts together span the initial sixty years of the first century. Luke was a physician by trade from Antioch in Syria and he often accompanied Paul on his apostolic journeys (Col 4:14; Philem 24) and was loyal to him until the end (2 Tim 4:11).

The gentle physician interviewed Mary and other eye-witnesses because he “he did not see the Lord in His flesh” himself and was therefore compiling an account, and some of the most unique stories could have come only from Mary.

Luke’s purpose was to collect the many stories and historical events from various sources and to compile them into a convincing and orderly account so that everyone would believe in Jesus the savior of the world.

Mark’s gospel was a primary source for Luke. Of Luke’s 1149 verses, about 320 are from Mark’s gospel. Luke’s Gospel is the longest book in the New Testament. The date of his writing was around AD 62, probably while caring for Paul under house arrest in Rome (Acts 28:16, 30). …

For the rest of the account, all you need to know about St. Luke, click HERE.

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We leave Thursday to begin filming the story of Elijah and Elisha! This is our 9th documentary in our Footprints of God series.

We will be filming it all through Jordan, Israel, the Palestinian West Bank and Egypt, especially Mount Sinai and the Monastery of St Macarius in the deserts west of Cairo.

We still need donations to help us cover the cost of the final production of this movie so if you have enjoyed the series and would like to help get this one completed please visit www.FOGhelp.com. All contributions are tax-deductible, very appreciated and with premiums available.

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The Stones Cry Out: What Does Archaeology Say about the Reliability of the Bible and the Catholic Faith?

May 22, 2017

How do we know the sites related to Jesus are authentic? Didn’t the truth of these places get lost in the mist of history? Is the Bible really historically reliable? Recently I did an interview with Tim Staples of Catholic Answers about the reliability of the Bible, the proof of archaeology and the authenticity of […]

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The Sign of the Cross: It’s History, Meaning and Biblical Basis

May 5, 2017

SIGN OF THE CROSS By Steve Ray The Sign of the Cross is a ritual gesture by which we confess two important mysteries: the Trinity and the centrality of the Cross. It is the most common and visible means by which we confess our faith. The Sign of the Cross is made by touching the […]

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Joseph the Sissy or Joseph the Worker – Feast Day of the Worker

May 1, 2017

Today is the Feast day of St. Joseph the Worker! There are some pictures of Joseph I don’t appreciate so much. They present him almost as soft, effeminate like he just came out of a beauty parlor. It appears he never worked in the real world and has not a wrinkle on his clothes or […]

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There are Two Seas in Palestine – Which One are You Like?

April 30, 2017

Since we are on a boat sailing the Sea of Galilee today, I thought I would share this parable that we will be reading to the pilgrims. Two Seas in Palestine, by Bruce Barton “There are two seas in Palestine. One is fresh, and fish are in it. Splashes of green adorn its banks. Trees […]

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How Much Can a Camel Drink? – as he bites me!

April 28, 2017

Since we will soon be in Jordan and Israel again riding camels, I thought I would post some fun and interesting facts – and a movie of the camel trying to bite me. I recently wrote the Bible Study on Genesis for www.CatholicScriptureStudy.com. In chapter 24 Abraham sends his unnamed servant to find a bride […]

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Newly Renovated Tomb of Christ in the Holy Sepulchre

April 27, 2017

Before our group arrived today Janet and I visited the Tomb of Christ in the Holy Sepulchre a few days after its unveiling without the ugly iron girders that used to surround it for support. Here are a few pictures of the new exterior and one of the interior. Nothing is really changed (except removal […]

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History of Middle East in 90 Seconds

April 26, 2017

Fascinating moving map. Click the image below to see biblical and modern history of the volatile and ever-changing Middle East.

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How Big was Noah’s Ark

April 21, 2017

It was a big boat at a time when big boats did not exist. It was a feat of genius ingenuity. You can read the instructions for building in Genesis 6:14-22. We are also told that the ark is a picture of the Church and salvation. In the ark Noah passed through the waters which […]

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When Was Jesus Crucified? How Long on the Cross? Do the Gospels Contradict Each Other?

April 14, 2017

Do the Gospels Conflict? How Long was Jesus on the Cross? (See also Was Jesus Crucified Naked? and How Long Was Jesus in the Tomb?) The question intrigued me sufficiently enough that I spent the best part of a day working on it. On the surface there seems to be a contradiction in the Gospels, mentioning different […]

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Was Jesus Crucified Naked? (Updated 4/13/17)

April 12, 2017

A gentleman heard me on Relevant Radio earlier. I had mentioned on the air that one of the great humiliations of a crucifixion was that a man was crucified naked. This thoughtful gentleman wrote to challenge my comments. Below is his e-mail and my response. Dear Mr. Ray, Please correct your description of the Passion. […]

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When Is the Word “Love” First Used in the Bible?

April 6, 2017

When is the first time the word love is used in the Bible? It is great fun to ask a million questions when you open the Bible. Good questions serve to unlock the treasure chest revealing untold riches. Since the Bible is a book and books are made of words, it is great fun to […]

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Forty Frozen Martyrs – we honor them today March 10

March 9, 2017

In my talk Swimming Upstream I usually tell the story of 40 Roman soldiers who chose to freeze naked on a frozen lake in 320 AD rather than deny Jesus Christ. St. Basil, Doctor of the Church, told of the heroic martyrdom of 40 soldiers in a homily. They had been executed fifty years before […]

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Power of the Olive Wood, Holy Land Rosaries

March 3, 2017

On each of our trips we offer olive wood Rosaries to our groups. These are made by Sisters in Bethlehem. We touch them to all the holy sites, especially all the Rosary sites. They are all blessed in Jerusalem before the pilgrims head back home. A Mother Superior wrote to me about her experience in […]

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