Delusional Famous Baptist Preacher

by Steve Ray on August 1, 2014

“It seems odd, that certain men who talk so much of what the Holy Spirit reveals to themselves, should think so little of what he has revealed to others.  (19th century London Anti-Catholic Baptist Charles H. Spurgeon in his Commenting and Commentaries, 1).

20111107-080421.jpgBut isn’t it ironic that Spurgeon is guilty of what he accuses others of neglecting? The Holy Spirit spoke through the Apostles and early bishops and their writings and practices are easily accessible.

They practiced the primacy of Rome, the Real Presence in the Eucharist, new birth through water baptism, a church structure with bishops, priests and deacons.

The 2nd century “church service” was a perfect blueprint of the Mass today and does not even remotely resemble the “Baptist church” of today.

Why does Spurgeon think so much of what he supposes the Holy Spirit showed him (a tradition unknown before the 16th century) while he ignores what the Holy Spirit universally revealed to the early Church and which has

{ 3 comments }

Andrew Mead January 5, 2012 at 11:25 PM

I don’t wish to be contentious but I’m not so certain Spurgeon implied the meaning attested to his words in this instance.
If he did, I have to comment that I believe his position concerning Catholicism was no more than “average” for an English, protestant clergyman of 19th century Great Britain. I’ve read a few of his sermons and that’s the feeling I get.
I’ve known a 20th century English pastor who “preached” a few times at Spurgeons Tabernacle in London during the 20th century–now, that was a man who was a real Catholic basher. He started the “Canadian Protestant league” in the 1940′s and it still exits today–but it’s absolutely moribund–I think it has no more than a few members and the only reason it barely exists and maintains a web site with office is because they accidently have too much “old” money.
An in-law relative, who was once the treasurer of this organization, asked me if I wanted to join. He suggested I could easily become the Chairman and that position would “open me up” to all sorts of influence and opportunity.
I thought about it for a second and turned the offer down. That was 15 years ago and even then my sensibilities were that I “protested” nothing the Pope or the Catholic Church were doing–rather, I “protested” what virtually all Protestant churches were doing or becoming. That represented a seminal moment in my passage towards Rome.
The R.C. Church has little to fear from protestant churches currently. With a few significant, denominational exceptions-they’re greying and contemplating shutting down their churches within a few years–a symptom of leaving the issue of contraception up to one’s own conscience? Very much so but that’s only part of their sad story.
Thanks for reading.

Gore608 January 24, 2012 at 9:27 PM

STEVE RAY HERE. THIS COMMENT IS ONE OF THE WHACKIEST VIEWS OF HISTORY I’VE EVER SEEN. IT WOULD BE FUNNY IF IT WEREN’T SO SAD. I COULD EASILY WRITE A 20PAGE RESPONSE IF I HAD TIME BUT I DON’T RIGHT NOW. HOPE SOMEONE ELSE DOES. SOMEONE HERE HAS HEARD THE RIDICULOUS FUNDAMENTALIST BILL OF GOODS AND IS PARROTING THIS TRADITION WITHOUT HAVING CRITICALLY QUESTIONING IT.

You don’t know your early history very well. During the first ecumenical councils during the 2nd century, and the formation of the universal church or catholic church, there were several early local church that did not want to submit to the higharch of Rome and the unbiblical practices i.e, baby baptism, baptizing unbelievers, and so on and so on. These early, incorruptible, churches were viciously attacked by Rome and the new unbiblical aborshon they established. Many of whom where martyred. They were given a label, antibaptist, or rebaptisers, and later shortened anabaptist. You can still find their doctrine today.
Thank you Gore608

Leo Kuku June 13, 2012 at 2:36 AM

Gore608,

Wait a minute, not so fast. Please find time and respond so the rest of us will gain knowledge. You are not specific and this makes verifying your claims difficult.
These holy local churches that you talk about, when did they break from the universal church of which the early church fathers write about. You see, am a catholic and I seek truth because in the end, it is what saves us. So if you find evidence that shows that Polycarp, Ignatius of Antioch, Irenaeus, Justine and all those early church fathers actually practiced something different from what the catholic church teaches then let me know. Please ask you pastors for evidence not statements. Also look up the teachings of the first churches that broke up from the universal church and see if thats what your church teaches.
Jesus prayed “that they may be one” and I believe that for God, words and actions are the same. When God said “be one”, Jn 17, 11, the church immediately was and remains one despite challenges like the weakness of some church leaders or some groups devoting themselves solely to attacking the church.
Please get back soon brother, and may God bless you

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